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Whether working in conjunction with pals including Harry Manx (three albums) and The Sisters Euclid (five albums), on his own (seven and more releases), or as a sideman, Breit always brings something engaging and frankly unique to his recorded appearances.

Blues, jazz, roots, and folk, Breit has demonstrated he can turn his hands and ears to every type of music.

One Mo Bo, a Bo Diddley homage, doesnt progress beyond its implicit limitations, and The Goldtooth Shuffle isnt much more than a groove, albeit a fine one, extended to three minutes. As Jim would say when he first met someone: Im the luckiest man you know and I dont even know who you know.

Hear the lead track "Ain't That Loving You" now: Great playing, good taste and a deep faith stacked high in the blues spills out generously on Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters intimate new album The Luckiest Man.

The result is a fascinating mix of daring, and fullbodied new compositions and fresh-sounding standards that followers have long savoured at their live shows.

Speaking of 'blues shocks,' it hardly seems possible that Billy Branch - once touted as one of the 'new generation' of blues musicians - is verging on elder statesman status in the blues community.

The reliable smooth Chicago texture of Southside Stomp a staple feel on any Earl and the Broadcasters album is set against the deep warmth of Jims Song written and performed by Earl for the memory of bandmate and bassist Jim Mouradian.

Vocalist Diane Blue throws out excellent phrasing and soul on Heartbreak (Its Killing Me) and just kills on Never Gonna Break My Faith surrounded by supple chops from Dave Limina on Hammond B-3 and Earls guitar solos and fills Personally speaking Sugar Ray Norcias song Long Lost Conversation is total blues bliss with Earl and The Bluetones. That song is followed by the gorgeous and soulful Sweet Miss Vee written by Earl.

Blues Shock represents the first studio-recorded release in nearly fifteen years from veterans Billy Branch and the Sons of Blues, and their first for Blind Pig.Always a sucker for a bit of Yakety Sax (or yakety axe), I Got Em Too is a favoured romp.However, other pieces appear little more than excuse for playful song titles as evidenced by Cozy With Rosy and Zing Zong Song, which initially borrows from theme, before sliding into Los Straitjackets territory. None of which diminishes the obvious skill and artistry Breit possesses, nor the encompassing appeal of this recording. Earl has worked with his band The Broadcasters for almost 30 years. This album is dedicated to the memory of long-time Broadcaster bass player Jim Mouradian.Last time out with the old-world, mandolin extravaganza to deliver a (largely) instrumental set of guitar-based tunes to evoke a smarmy, 60s lounge-vibe with Duane Eddy accompaniment.Blasting out the set in ten days, Breit called upon friends to provide select overdubs, but what we have here is essentially Breit concocting his own experiments in vintage sounds much like Neil Young once did (in a different vein) with the Shocking Pinks. While one digs (and really, no other word is as appropriate) what Breit has done with this recording, after four or five songs it tends to blend into one extended jam of righteous coolness.

Blues Shock represents the first studio-recorded release in nearly fifteen years from veterans Billy Branch and the Sons of Blues, and their first for Blind Pig.

Always a sucker for a bit of Yakety Sax (or yakety axe), I Got Em Too is a favoured romp.

However, other pieces appear little more than excuse for playful song titles as evidenced by Cozy With Rosy and Zing Zong Song, which initially borrows from theme, before sliding into Los Straitjackets territory. None of which diminishes the obvious skill and artistry Breit possesses, nor the encompassing appeal of this recording. Earl has worked with his band The Broadcasters for almost 30 years. This album is dedicated to the memory of long-time Broadcaster bass player Jim Mouradian.

Last time out with the old-world, mandolin extravaganza to deliver a (largely) instrumental set of guitar-based tunes to evoke a smarmy, 60s lounge-vibe with Duane Eddy accompaniment.

Blasting out the set in ten days, Breit called upon friends to provide select overdubs, but what we have here is essentially Breit concocting his own experiments in vintage sounds much like Neil Young once did (in a different vein) with the Shocking Pinks. While one digs (and really, no other word is as appropriate) what Breit has done with this recording, after four or five songs it tends to blend into one extended jam of righteous coolness.

Quite simply, Rod Piazza and The Mighty Flyers are one of the finest, most experienced, and most popular bands in blues today.