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16-Aug-2020 22:49

Initiation was a lifelong practice that starts in childhood or adolescence at the latest.

You could hear them on TV, films, adverts and video games, in shopping malls and pubs, or at festivals. (2003) Black Eyed Peas For a brief moment, Fergie didn’t mean Sir Alex. Goodies (2004) Ciara Texan smoocher, influenced by cough-syrup. Push The Button (2005) Sugababes Come-hither pop from the fractious but chart-conquering girlband. Hope There’s Someone (2004) Antony and the Johnsons 21st century vulnerability, achingly exposed, in a piano-backed, humanist prayer. Just Dance (2009) Lady Gaga US R&B collides with European electro-rave to create semi-clad party pop. Over and Over (2006) Hot Chip Electronic geek squad wittily capture the “joy of repetition” in raving. Reckoner (2007) Radiohead The sweeping highlight of the Oxonians’s pay-what-you-please album. American Idiot (2004) Green Day The closest mainstream American rock came to a Bush-baiting anthem. Is This The Way To Amarillo (2005) Tony Christie Peter Kaye video helped 70s toe-tapper strike charity record gold. American Boy (2008) Estelle and Kanye West A trans-Atlantic love story that revitalised Estelle’s career. Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad (1999) Moby Techno-gospel stand-out from Moby’s best-selling 'Play’ album. Music (2000) Madonna Her Madgesty, in the cowboy hat, with the beepy noises. Don’t Cha (2005) Pussycat Dolls Steamy but unsisterly hit from the American former burlesque troupers. One More Time (2000) Daft Punk Parisian duo autotune singer Romanthony to oblivion on robot disco classic. La Ritournelle (2004) Sebastien Tellier Symphonic epic that keeps its bearded French maker in TV usage fees. Kids (2008) MGMT Face-painted US duo more than match contemporary European synth-pop. Pure Shores (2000) All Saints From iffy flick 'The Beach’, William Orbit sends the alt-Spice Girls Balearic. Call On Me (2004) Eric Prydz Steve Winwood-sampling romp boosted by super-lewd gym-porn video. Grace Kelly (2007) Mika Brit-Lebanese popster shamelessly, ebulliently channels Queen via the Scissor Sisters. That’s Not My Name (2008) The Ting Tings Mickey Basil’s 'Mickey’ joyfully reimagined as a sliver of shouty pop-punk. I Don’t Feel like Dancin’ (2006) Scissor Sisters Elton John co-wrote the New York pop sensation’s ravishing biggest hit. Rock DJ (2000) Robbie Williams Cheeky rapping, sledgehammer beat and swaggering chorus from Britain’s favourite entertainer. Dance Wiv Me (2008) Dizzee Rascal with Calvin Harris The song that announced grime king Rascal had truly crossed over. Big Pimpin (2000) Jay-Z Nimble, flighty, Egyptian sampling delight from the rap supremo with studio wiz Timbaland. Leave Right Now (2003) Will Young The first ever Pop Idol winner’s noughties-style lounge ballad. Dy-na-mi-tee (2002) Ms Dynamite Dreamy, reggae drifts of 21st century lovers rock. Dare (2005) Gorillaz Great Britpop-meets-hip hop groove from the kings of the cartoon swingers. Golden Skans (2007) Klaxons Indie trio turn whooping psychedelic mysticism into pop gold. Try Again (2000) Aaliyah Squelchy, slinky, less-is-more Timbaland production for doomed R’n’B siren Watch it on You Tube Buy it on i Tunes 41.

Around the same period in time (early 19th century) these adepts started taking on new pupils.

This was new because they have thousand year old traditions of only revealing this info to initiates.

It sometimes feels like there has been no centre of pop gravity, as though everything has migrated to an ever-expanding margin, where every taste is catered for.

Arguably, the biggest phenomena have not been individual artists or thrilling new genres, but illegal downloading, the invention of the i Pod and i Tunes, the free music zones of You Tube, My Space and Spotify and the democratisation of the means of production and distribution that allows any kid with a computer to become a legend in their own bedroom studio.

You could hear them on TV, films, adverts and video games, in shopping malls and pubs, or at festivals. (2003) Black Eyed Peas For a brief moment, Fergie didn’t mean Sir Alex. Goodies (2004) Ciara Texan smoocher, influenced by cough-syrup. Push The Button (2005) Sugababes Come-hither pop from the fractious but chart-conquering girlband. Hope There’s Someone (2004) Antony and the Johnsons 21st century vulnerability, achingly exposed, in a piano-backed, humanist prayer. Just Dance (2009) Lady Gaga US R&B collides with European electro-rave to create semi-clad party pop. Over and Over (2006) Hot Chip Electronic geek squad wittily capture the “joy of repetition” in raving. Reckoner (2007) Radiohead The sweeping highlight of the Oxonians’s pay-what-you-please album. American Idiot (2004) Green Day The closest mainstream American rock came to a Bush-baiting anthem. Is This The Way To Amarillo (2005) Tony Christie Peter Kaye video helped 70s toe-tapper strike charity record gold. American Boy (2008) Estelle and Kanye West A trans-Atlantic love story that revitalised Estelle’s career. Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad (1999) Moby Techno-gospel stand-out from Moby’s best-selling 'Play’ album. Music (2000) Madonna Her Madgesty, in the cowboy hat, with the beepy noises. Don’t Cha (2005) Pussycat Dolls Steamy but unsisterly hit from the American former burlesque troupers. One More Time (2000) Daft Punk Parisian duo autotune singer Romanthony to oblivion on robot disco classic. La Ritournelle (2004) Sebastien Tellier Symphonic epic that keeps its bearded French maker in TV usage fees. Kids (2008) MGMT Face-painted US duo more than match contemporary European synth-pop. Pure Shores (2000) All Saints From iffy flick 'The Beach’, William Orbit sends the alt-Spice Girls Balearic. Call On Me (2004) Eric Prydz Steve Winwood-sampling romp boosted by super-lewd gym-porn video. Grace Kelly (2007) Mika Brit-Lebanese popster shamelessly, ebulliently channels Queen via the Scissor Sisters. That’s Not My Name (2008) The Ting Tings Mickey Basil’s 'Mickey’ joyfully reimagined as a sliver of shouty pop-punk. I Don’t Feel like Dancin’ (2006) Scissor Sisters Elton John co-wrote the New York pop sensation’s ravishing biggest hit. Rock DJ (2000) Robbie Williams Cheeky rapping, sledgehammer beat and swaggering chorus from Britain’s favourite entertainer. Dance Wiv Me (2008) Dizzee Rascal with Calvin Harris The song that announced grime king Rascal had truly crossed over. Big Pimpin (2000) Jay-Z Nimble, flighty, Egyptian sampling delight from the rap supremo with studio wiz Timbaland. Leave Right Now (2003) Will Young The first ever Pop Idol winner’s noughties-style lounge ballad. Dy-na-mi-tee (2002) Ms Dynamite Dreamy, reggae drifts of 21st century lovers rock. Dare (2005) Gorillaz Great Britpop-meets-hip hop groove from the kings of the cartoon swingers. Golden Skans (2007) Klaxons Indie trio turn whooping psychedelic mysticism into pop gold. Try Again (2000) Aaliyah Squelchy, slinky, less-is-more Timbaland production for doomed R’n’B siren Watch it on You Tube Buy it on i Tunes 41.

Around the same period in time (early 19th century) these adepts started taking on new pupils.

This was new because they have thousand year old traditions of only revealing this info to initiates.

It sometimes feels like there has been no centre of pop gravity, as though everything has migrated to an ever-expanding margin, where every taste is catered for.

Arguably, the biggest phenomena have not been individual artists or thrilling new genres, but illegal downloading, the invention of the i Pod and i Tunes, the free music zones of You Tube, My Space and Spotify and the democratisation of the means of production and distribution that allows any kid with a computer to become a legend in their own bedroom studio.

Winehouse has an authentic soul voice and vivid character but her fame owes as much to her public disintegration as her music.