Dating rules in the 1990 s

14-Jul-2020 15:31

On December 1, 1978, the effective date of the amendment was postponed until July 1, 1979. 2d 330, 342); amended July 27, 2006, effective September 1, 2006The notice of appeal must be filed with the clerk of the circuit court within 30 days after the entry of the final judgment appealed from, or, if a timely posttrial motion directed against the judgment is filed, whether in a jury or a nonjury case, within 30 days after the entry of the order disposing of the last pending postjudgment motion directed against that judgment or order, irrespective of whether the circuit court had entered a series of final orders that were modified pursuant to postjudgment motions. An appropriate supporting record shall accompany the petition, including a record of proceedings, the petition filed in the circuit court, the decision of the circuit court, including the specific findings of fact and legal conclusions supporting the decision, and any other supporting documents or matters of record necessary to the petition.On June 1, 1979, the amendment was rescinded.) Amended August 9, 1983, effective October 1, 1983; amended February 1, 1984, effective February 1, 1984, with Justice Moran dissenting (see Yellow Cab Co. A judgment or order is not final and appealable while a Rule 137 claim remains pending unless the court enters a finding pursuant to Rule 304(a). The supporting record must be authenticated by the certificate of the circuit court clerk or by the affidavit of the attorney or party filing it. The Appellate Court shall appoint counsel to assist the petitioner if she so requests. The minor or incompetent petitioner may file a brief statement of facts and memorandum of law supporting her petition, which together shall not exceed 15 pages and which also must be filed within two days, excluding weekends and holidays, of the entry of the order being appealed under paragraph (a) of this Rule. All proceedings under this rule shall be confidential.An employer also may not ask job applicants if they have a disability (or about the nature of an obvious disability).An employer may ask job applicants whether they can perform the job and how they would perform the job, with or without a reasonable accommodation.Every final judgment of a circuit court in a civil case is appealable as of right. Amended December 17, 1993, effective February 1, 1994. Subparagraph (a)(2) protects the appellant who files a notice of appeal prior to the resolution of a still-pending claim that is determined to be a separate claim under Rule 304(a).The appeal is initiated by filing a notice of appeal. This rule, adopted pursuant to the authority given the Supreme Court by the judicial article effective January 1, 1964, former article VI, section 7, present article VI, section 16, prescribes the method of review of final judgments. Note that under subparagraph (a)(2), there is no need to file a second notice of appeal where the postjudgment order simply denies the appellant’s postjudgment motion.The law also protects people from discrimination based on their relationship with a person with a disability (even if they do not themselves have a disability).

Reasonable accommodation might include, for example, making the workplace accessible for wheelchair users or providing a reader or interpreter for someone who is blind or hearing impaired. An employer doesn't have to provide an accommodation if doing so would cause undue hardship to the employer.

An employer does not have to provide the exact accommodation the employee or job applicant wants.

If more than one accommodation works, the employer may choose which one to provide.

After a job is offered to an applicant, the law allows an employer to condition the job offer on the applicant answering certain medical questions or successfully passing a medical exam, but only if all new employees in the same type of job have to answer the questions or take the exam.

Once a person is hired and has started work, an employer generally can only ask medical questions or require a medical exam if the employer needs medical documentation to support an employee's request for an accommodation or if the employer believes that an employee is not able to perform a job successfully or safely because of a medical condition.

Reasonable accommodation might include, for example, making the workplace accessible for wheelchair users or providing a reader or interpreter for someone who is blind or hearing impaired. An employer doesn't have to provide an accommodation if doing so would cause undue hardship to the employer.

An employer does not have to provide the exact accommodation the employee or job applicant wants.

If more than one accommodation works, the employer may choose which one to provide.

After a job is offered to an applicant, the law allows an employer to condition the job offer on the applicant answering certain medical questions or successfully passing a medical exam, but only if all new employees in the same type of job have to answer the questions or take the exam.

Once a person is hired and has started work, an employer generally can only ask medical questions or require a medical exam if the employer needs medical documentation to support an employee's request for an accommodation or if the employer believes that an employee is not able to perform a job successfully or safely because of a medical condition.

Disability discrimination occurs when an employer or other entity covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, as amended, or the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, treats a qualified individual with a disability who is an employee or applicant unfavorably because she has a disability. Disability discrimination also occurs when a covered employer or other entity treats an applicant or employee less favorably because she has a history of a disability (such as cancer that is controlled or in remission) or because she is believed to have a physical or mental impairment that is not transitory (lasting or expected to last six months or less) and minor (even if she does not have such an impairment).