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Action, along with dialogue and the characters' thoughts, form the skeleton of a narrative's plot., see discussion under periphrasis.

ACYRON: The improper or odd application of a word, such as speaking of "streams of graces" (Shipley 5). ADAPTATION: Taking material from an older source and altering it or updating it in a new genre.

For modern artists, if the adaptation's source is unacknowledged, the adaptation may constitute plagiarism under modern conventions. ADDITIVE MONSTER: In contrast with the composite monster, mythologists and folklorists use the label additive monster to describe a creature from mythology or legend that has an altered number of body parts rather than body parts from multiple animals added together.

For instance, the Scandinavian Ettin, a troll or giant with two heads, is an additive monster.

The term has also been loosely applied to fantastic creatures that have modified limbs as well.

For instance, the gyascutis is a fantastic medieval beast that resembles a sheep, except its limbs vary in length.

Thus, Americans might be able to discern a Boston accent or a Texas accent by sound alone, or they might place a foreign speaker's origin by noting a French or Russian accent. ACEPHALOUS: From Greek "headless," acephalous lines are lines in normal iambic pentameter that contain only nine syllables rather than the expected ten. ACMEISM: A 1912 Russian poetry movement reacting against the Symbolist movement (Harkins 1). They are least useful when they obscure the truth, when they enable technobabble and unnecessary jargon.

Acrostics are also common in Kabbalistic charms and word squares, including the Cirencester word square of Roman origin: in classical Hebrew poetry.

In the early 1800s, the Romantic poets like Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley once again preferred concreteness. Hulme attempted to create a theory of concrete poetry. ABSTRACT POEM: Verse that makes little sense grammatically or syntactically but which relies on auditory patterns to create its meaning or poetic effects; Dame Edith Sitwell popularized the term, considering this verse form the equivalent of abstract painting (Deutsche 7). LASER), and eventually the capitalization falls away as the word enters common usage (e.g.

In the 20th century, the distinction between concrete and abstract has been a subject of some debate. Sitwell's poems from her collection ACATALECTIC: A "normal" line of poetry with the expected number of syllables in each line, as opposed to a catalectic line (which is missing an expected syllable) or a hypercatalectic line (which has one or more extra syllables than would normally be expected, perhaps due to anacrusis). ACCENT: (1) A recognizable manner of pronouncing words--often associated with a class, caste, ethnic group, or geographic region. Acronyms and alphabetisms are most useful when they allow a speaker to create a new, short, efficient term for a long unwieldy phrase.

Prominent members of the movement include Nikolay Gumilyov and Sergey Gorodetski. In general, acronyms first appear with periods to indicate the abbreviations, (e. Apart from puzzles in newspapers and magazines, the most common modern versions involve the first letters of each line forming a single word when read downwards.

An acrostic that involves the sequential letters of the alphabet is said to be an abecedarius or an abecedarian poem.

Acrostics are also common in Kabbalistic charms and word squares, including the Cirencester word square of Roman origin: in classical Hebrew poetry.

In the early 1800s, the Romantic poets like Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley once again preferred concreteness. Hulme attempted to create a theory of concrete poetry. ABSTRACT POEM: Verse that makes little sense grammatically or syntactically but which relies on auditory patterns to create its meaning or poetic effects; Dame Edith Sitwell popularized the term, considering this verse form the equivalent of abstract painting (Deutsche 7). LASER), and eventually the capitalization falls away as the word enters common usage (e.g.

In the 20th century, the distinction between concrete and abstract has been a subject of some debate. Sitwell's poems from her collection ACATALECTIC: A "normal" line of poetry with the expected number of syllables in each line, as opposed to a catalectic line (which is missing an expected syllable) or a hypercatalectic line (which has one or more extra syllables than would normally be expected, perhaps due to anacrusis). ACCENT: (1) A recognizable manner of pronouncing words--often associated with a class, caste, ethnic group, or geographic region. Acronyms and alphabetisms are most useful when they allow a speaker to create a new, short, efficient term for a long unwieldy phrase.

Prominent members of the movement include Nikolay Gumilyov and Sergey Gorodetski. In general, acronyms first appear with periods to indicate the abbreviations, (e. Apart from puzzles in newspapers and magazines, the most common modern versions involve the first letters of each line forming a single word when read downwards.

An acrostic that involves the sequential letters of the alphabet is said to be an abecedarius or an abecedarian poem.

Acrostics may have first been used as a mnemonic device to aid with oral transmission.