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All students receive a free meal daily, as well as free health care, transportation, learning materials, and counseling in their schools, so that the foundations for learning are in place.

Beyond that, access to quality curriculum and teachers has become a central aspect of Finnish educational policy.

A recent analysis of the Finnish system summarized its core principles as follows: The process of change has been almost the reverse of policies in the United States.

More than 50 percent of the Finnish adult population participates in adult education programs.

Although most immigrants are still from places like Sweden, the most rapidly growing newcomer groups since 1990 have been from Afghanistan, Bosnia, India, Iran, Iraq, Serbia, Somalia, Turkey, Thailand, and Vietnam. Yet achievement has been climbing in Finland and growing more equitable.

Because of these trends, many people have turned to Finland for clues to educational transformation.

This is true despite the fact that immigration from nations with lower levels of education has increased sharply in recent years, and there is more linguistic and cultural diversity for schools to contend with.

One recent analysis notes that in some urban schools the number of immigrant children or those whose mother tongue is not Finnish approaches 50 percent.

More than 50 percent of the Finnish adult population participates in adult education programs.

Although most immigrants are still from places like Sweden, the most rapidly growing newcomer groups since 1990 have been from Afghanistan, Bosnia, India, Iran, Iraq, Serbia, Somalia, Turkey, Thailand, and Vietnam. Yet achievement has been climbing in Finland and growing more equitable.

Because of these trends, many people have turned to Finland for clues to educational transformation.

This is true despite the fact that immigration from nations with lower levels of education has increased sharply in recent years, and there is more linguistic and cultural diversity for schools to contend with.

One recent analysis notes that in some urban schools the number of immigrant children or those whose mother tongue is not Finnish approaches 50 percent.

As one analyst notes: "Most visitors to Finland discover elegant school buildings filled with calm children and highly educated teachers.