Intimidating song

07-Feb-2020 12:16

The text is simly weird and I can´t really relate to it.

I can´t imagine why anyone would choose this song for a wedding.

starting from the beginning, "I heard there was a secret chord that David played and it pleased the Lord." David wrote most of the psalms. The next line is written to all who have no faith, and don't believe in the bible, let alone David. Despite knowing God, he still was willfully disobedient. It makes sense that he's referencing Samson, until the line "she broke your throne." Samson was a judge, not a king. Remember, though, this song was written by a person, and is not perfectly Biblical. We will go out of our way if we think it will make a girl like us.

His falling short of God's expectations peaks at this point, and for the rest of his life, he has to live with what he's done - despite God forgiving him. However, there is a chance that the verse is split to make a point about women in the Bible. The last verse is a picture of David and other men in the Bible who continue to sin. There's an entire study of this, but, this comment is long enough. I love the song, not matter what lyrics are used, the music is beautifully written.

You literally feel the cold and bitter emptiness of a man who feels he sacrificed his pride and humility for the bond of trust that comes with love (she tied you to a kitchen chair, she broke your throne, she cut your hair....) only to have it unravel because of not only tensions that inevitably develop later in a relationship ( I've seen your flag on the marble arch, Love is not a victory march...) but recognition of his own knowing contribution to the destruction of that love ( And all I ever learned from love was how to shoot at someone who outdrew you...). The moment his voice came from the radio, I started to listen carrefully and when the song ended, I felt really moved, I couldn't get that song out of my head.It would certainly make sense to honor Leonard Cohen as a Canadian icon, but he did not perform. I've been haunted by this ever since I first heard it on The West Wing. I saw him sing it live on the American Idols tour..I was just floored. It was so intense and emotional and you can feel all the desperation of someone questioning God in his voice.I later heard it on Criminal Minds and am now looking for the version that was used on C. I'm pretty sure it was one of Jeff Buckley's versions. Sings it with such gravity and sadness, it's almost Gothic. And with all of those people there, just everyone singing along, it was just purely amazing. It has been used on the medical comedy Scrubs and the medical drama House. I don't presently know about Cohen's negative feelings about the business, but you've made me curious. They align with an interpretation of making a deal with the devil for musical success. That said, here is what I've thought about every time I've heard the song: David was a favorite of God's, and despite so many failures, God continues to forgive him, even to the point of fulfilling his promise that the messiah would be from David's lineage. The point I'm trying to make is that for all of us, believing requires faith. "It goes like this the fourth, the fifth, the minor fall the major lift" many songs use these chord progressions. "It shows the power of art being whatever someone can take from it(although it's unfortunate if someone get's something offensely the opposite of what the writer wanted ----ie Reagan using Springsteen's "Born in the USA" ).

You literally feel the cold and bitter emptiness of a man who feels he sacrificed his pride and humility for the bond of trust that comes with love (she tied you to a kitchen chair, she broke your throne, she cut your hair....) only to have it unravel because of not only tensions that inevitably develop later in a relationship ( I've seen your flag on the marble arch, Love is not a victory march...) but recognition of his own knowing contribution to the destruction of that love ( And all I ever learned from love was how to shoot at someone who outdrew you...). The moment his voice came from the radio, I started to listen carrefully and when the song ended, I felt really moved, I couldn't get that song out of my head.It would certainly make sense to honor Leonard Cohen as a Canadian icon, but he did not perform. I've been haunted by this ever since I first heard it on The West Wing. I saw him sing it live on the American Idols tour..I was just floored. It was so intense and emotional and you can feel all the desperation of someone questioning God in his voice.I later heard it on Criminal Minds and am now looking for the version that was used on C. I'm pretty sure it was one of Jeff Buckley's versions. Sings it with such gravity and sadness, it's almost Gothic. And with all of those people there, just everyone singing along, it was just purely amazing. It has been used on the medical comedy Scrubs and the medical drama House. I don't presently know about Cohen's negative feelings about the business, but you've made me curious. They align with an interpretation of making a deal with the devil for musical success. That said, here is what I've thought about every time I've heard the song: David was a favorite of God's, and despite so many failures, God continues to forgive him, even to the point of fulfilling his promise that the messiah would be from David's lineage. The point I'm trying to make is that for all of us, believing requires faith. "It goes like this the fourth, the fifth, the minor fall the major lift" many songs use these chord progressions. "It shows the power of art being whatever someone can take from it(although it's unfortunate if someone get's something offensely the opposite of what the writer wanted ----ie Reagan using Springsteen's "Born in the USA" ).Eve didn't want to sin alone, so she asked Adam to join her. They've been here before, but seem to be powerless to stop it. I was told by an expert on the bible that the word virgin at the time of Jesus meant a very young woman; that it did not mean she was a virgin by our definition. Anyway it is another interpretation and there are certainly many when it comes to the bible.