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DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY FORREST GARNER DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY EDITED BY LESLIE STEPHEN VOL. W'ith Travels through various parts of Persia,' &c., London, 1836, 2 vols. His works of travel had a certain value when first published on account of the extreme igno- rance of the countries described which then prevailed ; but owing to the author's lack of all but the most elementary knowledge of physical science they constituted no solid i contribution to systematic geography. At Hyderabad, which he regarded as being, for good or evil, the political centre of India, Fraser remained fourteen years, his residence ending before the enlightened administration of that state by Sir Salar Jung. His third, fourth, and fifth visits to North America were made in 1790, 1791, and 1795, he having in the latter year established a nursery at Sloane Square, Chelsea, to which his discoveries were con- signed. He was certainly living in London in June 1866 (ib. in the same year he was ap- pointed lord ordinary in exchequer cases. Ross-shire, then occupied by his father, who suffered imprisonment for joining the expe- dition of Dundee in 1689 ; the next year served under General Buchan, and in 1696 joined with Lord Drummond and other noble- men in an attempt to surprise Edinburgh Castle (Memoirs, 1797, p. He there so ingratiated himself with his cousin, whom he describes as of ' con- tracted understanding,' that Lord Lovat made a universal bequest to him of all his estates in case he should die without male issue, an opportune arrangement, for Lovat died very shortly after his return from London. 1614), epi- grammatist, a Gloucestershire man, ' of the same family of those of Batsford and To- denham, near to Morton-in-Marsh ' (WOOD, Athence\ became a student of Magdalen Col- lege, Oxford, in 1607, and took his degree of B. Professionally he was highly esteemed by his contemporaries both in this country and on the continent, though he cannot in any sense be reckoned among the really great physi- cians. Swift records in his ' Journal to Stella,' under date 1 Feb. In 1728 the numbers of the school reached 434, inclusive of the forty boys on the founda- tion. 122-4), where a Latin ode by Freind ' On the Death of Queen Caroline ' will also be found (ib. Besides these fugitive pieces Freind pub- lished the two following works : 1. Fuller was also appointed ' chaplain in extraordinary ' to the king, and further preferment was anticipated. In commemoration of the Lady Frances Clifton,' &c., 4to, London, 1628. 1667, and a conversation he held with him on the probability of the Act of Toleration being carried, 23 Jan. In 1669 Fuller offered the archdeaconry of Huntingdon to Symon Patrick, afterwards bishop of Ely, which was declined by Patrick, ' thinking himself unfit for that government' (PATRICK, 'Autobiography,' Works, ix. During his tenure of the see of Lincoln Fuller did much to repair the damages inflicted on his cathe- dral church by the puritans during the great rebellion. Hugh, which the inscription shows he had in- tended to be his own monument also : ' Hugo- nis Qui condit tumulum condit et ipse suum.' At the time of his death Fuller was engaged upon a life of Archbishop Bramhall, for which he had collected large materials, ' wherein/ writes Wood, ' as in many things he did, he would without doubt have quitted himself as much to the instruction of the living as to the honour of the dead' (Woo D, Athenes Oxon. His will speaks of his having had to undertake lawsuits to protect his see ' from the encroachments of ungodly men.' [Wood's Athense Oxon. His petition to the House of Commons to be allowed to prove that the Prince of Wales was an impostor was re- ceived with contempt. In 1769 he obtained the third premium of thirty guineas for a design for the Royal Exchange, now the City Hall, Dublin (erected by T. GARBETT, JAMES (1802-1879), arch- deacon of Chichester and professor of poetry at Oxford, born at Hereford in 1802, was eldest son of the Rev. 1825 ; was fellow of Queen's Col- lege, 1824-5 ; fellow of Brasenose College, 1825-36 ; tutor, 1827 ; Hulmeian lecturer in divinity, 1828 ; junior dean, 1832 ; and Latin lecturer, 1834. ' A Winter's Journey (Tatar) from Constantinople to Teheran. In later life he resided on and gave much atten- tion to improving his estate at Reelick, of which county he was deputy-lieutenant. Fraser married in 1823 Jane, daughter of Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee [q. 1842 referred to this affair, and stated that his ' conduct in the difficult and trying circumstances in which he was placed was such as they should have expected from the well-known j udgment, temper, a nd energy of that distinguished officer and merits the highest approbation' (information supplied by the India Office). In 1784 he embarked for Charles- ton, whence he returned in 1785, only to start again the same year. He therefore left England, and obtained employment at Woodward's Gar- dens at San Francisco, which he is said to have quitted for some occupation in Van- couver's Island. In his career at the bar he was engaged in some of the greatest causes of his day, including the Yelverton case and the two famous suc- cession cases of Breadalbane and Udny. On the resignation of Lord Giffordhe was appointed a lord of session with the title of Lord Fraser, and on 15 Nov. Outdoor Studies in Marine Zoology and Botany, and Maritime Geology, 7 " London, 1868, 8vo. His birth- place was probably a small house in Tanich. Indeed, he curiously united the peculiarities of a wild highland chief with those of a cultivated gentleman. The proposal was, he states, ex- tremely distasteful to him, and only assented to on the assurance that the design of Lord Murray in accepting the regiment was trea- cherously to aid King James with it 'in a descent he had promised to make during the ensuing summer.' In 1696 he accompanied Lord Murray (who in July was created Earl of Tullibardine) and his cousin, Lord Lovat, to London. Brit.,' as Aikin points out, ' towards his ac- quaintance affectionate '), testifies to his en- joyment of the convivial habits of his time. His house was the resort of the wits and other famous men of the time. Indeed the list of boys who recited the epigrams at the anniversary dinner in 1727-8 contains a far greater number of distinguished names than any other school at that period could have shown (Comitia Westmonasteriensia, 1728). Freind on his quitting Westminster School,' alludes to several of his famous pupils ( Gent. 223-4): Let Freind affect to speak as Terence spoke, And Alsop never but like Horace joke.' Freind's niece, however, married a son of Bentley, who is said after that event to have conceived a better opinion of Christ Church men, and to have declared that ' Freind had more good learning in him than ever he had imagined.' While a student Freind con- tributed some English verses to the ' Vota Oxoniensia (1689) ' On the Inauguration of King William and Queen Mary,' which were reprinted in Nichols's ' Select Collection of Poems ' (vii. Two of his Latin poems, entitled ' Encaenium Rusti- cum, anglice a Country Wake,' and ' Pugna Gallorum Gallinaceorum,' are printed in the 'Musarum Anglicanarum Delectus Alter,' 1698 (pp. 'Oratio publice habita in Schola Westmonasteriensi 7 die Maii, 1705, aucthore Roberto Friend, A. One half will never be believ'd, The other never read. Pinney, however, was dis- missed before January 1662. Patrick's, and was ' much pleased with his company and goodness.' His elevation to the sees first of Limerick and then of Lincoln caused Pepys ' great joy,' and more especially as he found that his old friend * was not spoiled by his elevation, but was the same good man as ever ; ' ' one of the come- liest and most becoming prelates he ever saw ;' * a very extraordinary, good-natured man.' He records the satisfaction with which he saw the bishop for the first time occupying his place in the House of Lords on 6 Nov. His end, according to his epitaph, was as peaceful as his life had been : ' mortem obiit lenissima vita si fieri posset leniorem.' His body was conveyed to Lincoln Cathedral, and interred there under an altar tomb in the retrochoir, by the side of the monument he had erected over the supposed grave of St. He bequeathed to the cathedral library of Lincoln the best of his books, and to Christ Church his pictures, chest of viols, and his organ. Fuller sent copies of his book to the king and leading" statesmen. In conjunction with John Woolfe, architect to the board of works, Gandon published a continuation of Colin Campbell's ' Vitruvius Britannicus,' 2 vols. In 1767 he ex- hibited at the Incorporated Society of Artists ' a mausoleum to the memory of Handel, erected in the demesne of Sir Samuel Hillier in Staffordshire.' On the foundation of the Royal Academy in 1768 he became a stu- dent, and won the first gold medal awarded in architecture (1769). He also con- tributed to the ' Edinburgh Cabinet Library,' vol. On 28 June 1838 Fraser became a major-gene- ral, which was regarded as an exceptional case of rapid promotion by seniority. 1839 he was appointed resident at Hyderabad, and was vested with a general superintendence over the post-offices and post-roads of the nizam's dominions. FRASER, JOHN (1750-1811), botanist, was born at Tomnacloich, Inverness-shire, in. 1849), poet, born at Birr, King's County, about 1809, was by occupation a cabinet-maker, but em- ployed his leisure in literary studies. de Dean, a considerable quantity of sentimental and patriotic verse of no great merit. [Hayes's Ballads of Ireland (where some of his effusions are collected).] J. Here Ms time was fully occupied in making a scien- tific catalogue of the magnificent zoological .collections. 245), from which he was recalled by Lord Palmerston. The volume contains figures of twenty-eight mammals and forty- six birds, all of which were then of particular interest as representations of specimens ori- ginally described by the respective authors as the types of new genera or additional species of genera previously characterised ; besides which the plates are enriched with drawings of many rare and beautiful plants. In 1843 he was called to the bar, and three years later he published ' The Law of Personal and Domestic Relations/ which attracted a great deal of attention among both professional and non- professional readers. Simon, twelfth lord, was the son of Thomas Fraser, styled afterwards ' of Beaufort ' (Castle Dow- _ nie, the chief seat of the family), third son of the eighth Lord Lovat. Some said that his former friends and ac- quaintances began to shun and despise him ; and his brother Robert (in the Latin dedi- cation to the queen prefixed to the collected edition of his works) speaks of his having- to bear ' non modo contumelias, sed etiam susurros.' We are not, however, obliged to suppose that there was on his part any un- worthy sacrifice of his political opinions to his- interest, and his old friend Atterbury after his death expressed this conviction. There is also in the library of the same college a bust of Freind, executed by Rysbrack in 1738. A Latin ode to the Duke of Newcastle, written by Freind in 1737, appears in the ' Gentleman's Magazine ' (vii. Freind also wrote the lengthy dedication to the queen prefixed to the medical works of his brother John, which were published in 1733, and a number of epitaphs and other monu- mental inscriptions, the one on Lord Cart eret's younger brother, Philip, whose monument is in the north aisle of Westminster Abbey, being perhaps the best known. Heylyn answered in the appendix to his ' Cer- tamen Epistolare, or The Letter-combate.' They had afterwards a personal interview at Heylyn's house at Abingdon and parted on friendly terms. Wyatt was rewarded by his former principal when bishop of Lincoln with the precentorship of that cathedral (Woo D, Fasti, ii. So consistent a loyalist naturally obtained speedy preferment at the Restoration. But he manifested a warm interest in the repair of his cathedral, which during his tenure of office was restored from a ruinous condition to decency and stability (MASosr, Hist, of St. In 1667 Laney was translated from the -bishopric of Lincoln to that of Ely. Asaph, which had previously become vacant, had been promised by the king to Dr. Rain- bow, the bishop of Carlisle, was not unwilling to accept Asaph. The former mentions having dined with him at Knightsbridge on 25 March 1674, together with the bishops of Salisbury (Seth Ward) and Chester (Pearson). The revived story met some belief,, and Fuller quickly followed up his success. GANDON, JAMES (1743-1823), archi- tect, born in New Bond Street, London, on 29 Feb. a good classical and mathematical education and developed an early taste for drawing. 1574), when he seems to have been suspended for insubordination (ib. Am- brose, born at Oxford in 1584, received the privileges of an Oxford citizen in 1601 (Oaf. 12mo, which was followed by ' Tales of the Caravanserai,' being vol. of the ' Library of Romance,' edited by Leitch Ritchie, London, 1833, 12mo. He appears, however, to have interfered in the disputes of the Syrian Christians at Travancore and afterwards, and so to have incurred the dis- Fraser 213 Fraser pleasure of the Madras government ' (infor- mation supplied by the India Office). Returning home he entered the service of Lord Derby as temporary conser- vator of the menagerie at Knowsley. In addition 'to numerous papers in the publications of the Zoological Society, of which he was elected a corre- sponding member in 1857, Fraser was the author of ' Zoologia Typica ; or Figures of New and Rare Mammals and Birds, described in the Proceedings, or exhibited in the Col- lections of the Zoological Society of London,' fol., London, 1849. Bartlett ; Pre- face to ' Zoologia Typica ;' Thacker's Indian Di- rectory (1888), p. He was educated at the Perth grammar school and at the university of St. Going to Edinburgh he entered the office of William Fraser, clerk to the burgh of Canongate, and he afterwards served in the firm of Todd & Hill, writers to the signet. In 1431 Hugh, grandson of Simon, was created a lord of par- liament under the title Lord Lovat. Not long after his release he was called to attend the children of the Princess of Wales, afterwards Queen Caro- line, and this led to his being appointed her physician when she ascended the throne in. That so strong a partisan as Freind, with his Jacobite propensities, should have had such a post offered to him, and still more that he should have accepted it, seems to have given rise to much ill-natured comment. v.] There are two portraits of Freind at Christ Church, the one in the hall being painted by Michael Dahl. 257, 592; Wood's Antiquities of Oxford (Gutch), iii. Fuller replied with characteristic candour and good temper, though not without some smart retorts, in his 'Appeal for Injured Innocence.' An appended letter to Heylyn courteously proposes an amicable agreement to differ. While at Twickenham he had for his assistant William Wyatt, who had acted in the same capacity to Jeremy Taylor when he main- tained himself by keeping school at Llanfi- hangel in Carmarthenshire, in conjunction with Nicholson, afterwards bishop of Glou- cester. at his own university on 2 Aug., by virtue of a letter of the chancellor, and also was admitted D. For this ceremonial an anthem was composed by Fuller, entitled ' Quum denuo exaltavit Dominus coronam.' It is evident that Fuller regarded his Irish dignities as little more than stepping-stones to some more acceptable English preferment. Patrick's we are told that he spent the greater portion of his time in England, leaving the sub-dean to pre- side at chapter meetings. At last, after frequent disappointments, the long-looked-for transla- tion to an English see took place. Fuller enjoyed the friendship both of Evelyn and of Pepys. James's Palace he had witnessed on 10 June 1688 the transference of a warm- ing pan from the chamber of a pregnant lady r Mary Grey, to that of the queen, and that this warming-pan contained the child of Mary Grey. Four members of the third generation of the same family are often met with. Besides the book already mentioned, Fraser wrote memoirs of his life, published at Edinburgh in 1738. After three months of terrible suffering, he with his wife was among the hundred persons who were made a present of to the laird of Pitlochie and shipped for New Jersey, where they were to be disposed of for the laird's benefit. James Fraser, the son, was a man of con- siderable theological learning, and besides dis- | charging his pastoral duties in a highly edify- I ing way, showed no little ability as a biblical | critic. The treatise entitled ' The Scripture Doctrine of Sanctification ' (Edinb. He was again umpire in March 1876, and in 1878, during the great north-east Lancashire cotton strike, the men offered to refer the dispute to him, but the masters re- fused. From the fact that John Freind by a will made in March 1727 left him 1001. In the winter of 1646-7 he hospitably received his old college friend at Boughton House. By his own account he was son of Robert Fuller, son of Dr. He was sent to school at Maidstone and Canterbury, and his putative father, Robert Fuller, having died when he was six months old, he was ap- prenticed in 1686 by Harflet to a rabbit furrier in London. In 1565 Bishop Jewel, who was friendly with Garbrand's father, presented him to a pre- bendal stall in Salisbury Cathedral, where he subsequently held two other prebends. He was twice married : first to a lady, Jean G , 31 July 1672, who died in October 1676 ; and secondly to Christian Inglis, widow of Alexander Carmichael, mi- nister of Pettinain, Lanarkshire. 585 ; Walker's Theology and Theologians of Scotland.] W. The father, a native of the highlands, graduated at Aber- deen in 1678, attended dissenting meetings in London, was seized with Alexander Shiels in 1684, was sent to Leith, and thence, chained with Shiels, in the kitchen-yacht to Edin- burgh, and was imprisoned in Dunottar Castle . He earned for himself the name of 'bishop of all denominations.' In 1874 he was chosen umpire between the masters and men in the Manchester and Sal- ford painting trade, and his award, made 27 March, secured peace for the trade for two years. He is described in his father's epitaph at Croughton, North- amptonshire (which is proved by its contents to have been written between 17), as ' lord of the manor of Hitcham, Bucks.' This manor was certainly the property of John Freind in 17, so that pos- sibly William Freind bought it from John and resold it after squandering his money. Edward, lord Montagu (son of the first lord, who died 1644), had taken the parliamentary side. In any case Fuller was apparently able to rely on the support of Charles Herbert, his alleged uncle, whose family had a seat at his birthplace. His first appearance in convocation was to second- Dean Howson's motion in favour of the dis- use of the Athanasian Creed ; his first speech in the House of Lords was on , in support of the abolition of university tests ; and he said characteristically to his diocesan conference, in 1875 : ' If the law requires me to wear a cope, though I don't" like the notion of making a guy of myself, I will wear one.' Yet he was fated to appear as a religious persecutor, to his own infinite distress. He was meanwhile leading an unset- tled life, finding time to publish a few sermons and books of contemplation and occasionally preaching. Clement's, Eastcheap, although from the preface to a sermon published in that year it appears that he was prohibited from preach- ing until further order. Crone's trial and conviction were delayed three weeks in consequence of an alleged attempt to poison Fuller, the principal wit- ness, which kept him too ill to appear in court. He had little sympathy with the tractarian high churchmen, and in all matters of practice he was extremely liberal, and more disposed to take a legal than an ecclesiastical view of such matters. Fuller, it is said by his biographer, was so affected by the king's death as to throw aside the composi- tion of the ' Worthies ; ' he preached a sermon on ' The Just Man's Funeral,' evidently re- ferring to it ; but he did not break with Dan- vers, one of the most regular judges at the trial. He continued to carry Jacobite letters, which he betrayed to the government, till exposed by his be- trayal of another messenger, Matthew Crone.

He yet found material for re- cording in his diary many matters that called for gratitude. His new sphere was the most difficult of its kind in the kingdom. It was a huge industrial community, with little interest in ecclesiastical affairs. Fuller, however, declined an offer which could hardly have been carried into effect.

He was a member of the assemblies of 16, had a call from Inverness in September 1696, but died at Edinburgh 13 Sept. Fraser was a man of peculiar type, independent and sometimes singular in his views, an ultra- Calvinist, yet with a certain doctrine of uni- versalism. ii.) ; Anderson's Martyrs of the Bass (in the Bass Eock, 1848); Wodrow's History; Scott's Fasti, iv. FRASER, JAMES (1700-1769), Scotch divine (sometimes called FRASER OF PITCAL- ZIAN), was born in 1700 at the manse of Al- ness in Ross-shire, where his father, the Rev. 1711), was minister from 1696 till his death in 1711. on the part of Fraser for assault and Berkeley for libel. ' Omnipresence,' said his foes, ' was his forte, and omniscience his foible.' Not being a born orator, or even a very good one, and speaking constantly on all topics without time for preparation, it is that he said some rash things and many trite ones, and laid himself open to frequent attack ; but his absolute frankness and fear- lessness of speech won the heart of his people, and his strong good sense and honesty com- manded their respect. In 1714 he succeeded Robert Freind as rector of Turvey, Bedfordshire, a living then in the gift of the Earl of Peter- borough, and in he was instituted rec- tor of the southern mediety of Woodford by Thrapston, Northamptonshire. His wife, too, who was buried at Burnham, Buckinghamshire, in 1721, is praised in an inscription in the church for her liberality to the poor. 85, 90-2, 697 ; List of Queen's Scholars of Westminster ; Oxford Cat. He had many influential friends who served him during the troubled times following so as to place him in a better position than most of the ejected clergy. mother was the dissolute daughter of a farmer named Sandys, and thought him very like his so-called guardian, Cornelius Harflet.

In 1689 he was minister of Culross, Perthshire, where he exercised his ministry with diligence and earnestness. The portraits were reduced in size and the literary matter much increased in ' The Maclise Portrait Gallery,' by William Bates, with eighty-five portraits, London, 1883, sm. v.] upon the publisher in consequence of a severe criticism of his novel ' Berkeley Castle.' Cross actions were tried 3 Dec. He was to be seen going about the streets on foot, his robe-bag in his hand ; he addressed meetings several times a day; he spoke to workmen in mills, and to actors in theatres ; he was diligent in attending his diocesan registry ; he was a member of the governing bodies of Manchester and Shrewsbury gram- mar schools and of the Owens College, visi- tor of the high school for girls and of the commercial school, and president of the Col- lege for Women. to the living of Biddies- den, Buckinghamshire, and with Archdeacon Franks in giving the same sum to the living of Ampthill, Bedfordshire, in order to enable them to obtain grants from Queen Anne's Bounty. He could not obtain terms which would permit of his being ' restored to the exercise of his profession.' He employed himself in writing his 'Andronicus,' published in the autumn.

Some of its views in favour of a universal reference in the work of Christ were strongly objected to by certain of his brethren who saw it in manuscript, and it was not till 1722 that the first part was published, the second appearing in 1749. The machinery of diocesan organisation was defective, and little was being done for church extension. 218 ; Bedfordshire Poll, 1714-15; Bishop Newton's Works with Life, 4to, p. In the winter of 1645-6 the town was invested by Fairfax.

He wrote also a treatise on j ustifying faith, of which many edi- tions have been printed. To a new bishop the nonconformists' attitude was critical, and on the part of many hostile. He preached and worked at his 'Worthies,' and wrote his * Good Thoughts in Bad Times,' published at Exeter in 1645.

He yet found material for re- cording in his diary many matters that called for gratitude. His new sphere was the most difficult of its kind in the kingdom. It was a huge industrial community, with little interest in ecclesiastical affairs. Fuller, however, declined an offer which could hardly have been carried into effect.

He was a member of the assemblies of 16, had a call from Inverness in September 1696, but died at Edinburgh 13 Sept. Fraser was a man of peculiar type, independent and sometimes singular in his views, an ultra- Calvinist, yet with a certain doctrine of uni- versalism. ii.) ; Anderson's Martyrs of the Bass (in the Bass Eock, 1848); Wodrow's History; Scott's Fasti, iv. FRASER, JAMES (1700-1769), Scotch divine (sometimes called FRASER OF PITCAL- ZIAN), was born in 1700 at the manse of Al- ness in Ross-shire, where his father, the Rev. 1711), was minister from 1696 till his death in 1711. on the part of Fraser for assault and Berkeley for libel. ' Omnipresence,' said his foes, ' was his forte, and omniscience his foible.' Not being a born orator, or even a very good one, and speaking constantly on all topics without time for preparation, it is that he said some rash things and many trite ones, and laid himself open to frequent attack ; but his absolute frankness and fear- lessness of speech won the heart of his people, and his strong good sense and honesty com- manded their respect. In 1714 he succeeded Robert Freind as rector of Turvey, Bedfordshire, a living then in the gift of the Earl of Peter- borough, and in he was instituted rec- tor of the southern mediety of Woodford by Thrapston, Northamptonshire. His wife, too, who was buried at Burnham, Buckinghamshire, in 1721, is praised in an inscription in the church for her liberality to the poor. 85, 90-2, 697 ; List of Queen's Scholars of Westminster ; Oxford Cat. He had many influential friends who served him during the troubled times following so as to place him in a better position than most of the ejected clergy. mother was the dissolute daughter of a farmer named Sandys, and thought him very like his so-called guardian, Cornelius Harflet.

In 1689 he was minister of Culross, Perthshire, where he exercised his ministry with diligence and earnestness. The portraits were reduced in size and the literary matter much increased in ' The Maclise Portrait Gallery,' by William Bates, with eighty-five portraits, London, 1883, sm. v.] upon the publisher in consequence of a severe criticism of his novel ' Berkeley Castle.' Cross actions were tried 3 Dec. He was to be seen going about the streets on foot, his robe-bag in his hand ; he addressed meetings several times a day; he spoke to workmen in mills, and to actors in theatres ; he was diligent in attending his diocesan registry ; he was a member of the governing bodies of Manchester and Shrewsbury gram- mar schools and of the Owens College, visi- tor of the high school for girls and of the commercial school, and president of the Col- lege for Women. to the living of Biddies- den, Buckinghamshire, and with Archdeacon Franks in giving the same sum to the living of Ampthill, Bedfordshire, in order to enable them to obtain grants from Queen Anne's Bounty. He could not obtain terms which would permit of his being ' restored to the exercise of his profession.' He employed himself in writing his 'Andronicus,' published in the autumn.

Some of its views in favour of a universal reference in the work of Christ were strongly objected to by certain of his brethren who saw it in manuscript, and it was not till 1722 that the first part was published, the second appearing in 1749. The machinery of diocesan organisation was defective, and little was being done for church extension. 218 ; Bedfordshire Poll, 1714-15; Bishop Newton's Works with Life, 4to, p. In the winter of 1645-6 the town was invested by Fairfax.

He wrote also a treatise on j ustifying faith, of which many edi- tions have been printed. To a new bishop the nonconformists' attitude was critical, and on the part of many hostile. He preached and worked at his 'Worthies,' and wrote his * Good Thoughts in Bad Times,' published at Exeter in 1645.

A third, entitled ' Defence of the Convention Eraser 208 Fraser of Estates, 1689,' vindicates that body for having declared that James VII had forfeited his right to the crown and that his throne was vacant. He never was a professed theologian, but his views were on the whole of the old high church school. The inti- macy continued until Dan vers's death in 1655, although Danvers was one of those who signed the death-warrant of Charles. He thereupon disclosed all he knew to the Earl of Shrewsbury, and was formally thanked by William III, in whose presence Fuller cut open the buttons of his coat, and disclosed the letters he was carrying to various Jacobites. John, one of the younger sons of Herks Garbrand, entered Winchester College in 1556, was admitted probationary fellow of New College, Oxford, 24 March 1560, and perpetual fellow in 1562, proceeding B.