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first trans-Atlantic delivery by air to London occurred in 1919 by dirigible. In the 1940s, the paper extended its breadth and reach.

The crossword began appearing regularly in 1942, and the fashion section in 1946.

However, when local California newspapers came into prominence, the effort failed.

On April 21, 1861, The New York Times departed from its original Monday–Saturday publishing schedule and joined other major dailies in adding a Sunday edition to offer daily coverage of the Civil War.

In 1971, the Pentagon Papers, a secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1967, were given ("leaked") to Neil Sheehan of The New York Times by former State Department official Daniel Ellsberg, with his friend Anthony Russo assisting in copying them.

The New York Times began publishing excerpts as a series of articles on June 13. The papers revealed, among other things, that the government had deliberately expanded its role in the war by conducting air strikes over Laos, raids along the coast of North Vietnam, and offensive actions taken by U. Marines well before the public was told about the actions, all while President Lyndon B. The document increased the credibility gap for the U. government, and hurt efforts by the Nixon administration to fight the ongoing war. On June 30, 1971, the Supreme Court held in a 6–3 decision that the injunctions were unconstitutional prior restraints and that the government had not met the burden of proof required.

Beginning October 16, 2009, a two-page "Bay Area" insert was added to copies of the Northern California edition on Fridays and Sundays.

The newspaper commenced production of a similar Friday and Sunday insert to the Chicago edition on November 20, 2009.

This was a jab at competing papers such as Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal which were now being known for a lurid, sensationalist and often inaccurate reporting of facts and opinions known by the end of the century as "yellow journalism".The newspaper's influence grew during 1870–1 when it published a series of exposés on William Magear ("Boss") Tweed, leader of the city's Democratic Party—popularly known as "Tammany Hall" (from its early 19th Century meeting headquarters)—that led to the end of the "Tweed Ring's" domination of New York's City Hall.While this move cost The New York Times a portion of its readership among its more progressive and Republican readers (the revenue went down from 8,000 to ,000 from 1883-4; however, some part of this was due to the price going down to two cents, in order to compete with the World and Sun), the paper eventually regained most of its lost ground within a few years.When The New York Times began publishing its series, President Richard Nixon became incensed. Supreme Court agreed to take both cases, merging them into New York Times Co. The justices wrote nine separate opinions, disagreeing on significant substantive issues.His words to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger included "People have gotta be put to the torch for this sort of thing..." and "Let's get the son-of-a-bitch in jail." After failing to get The New York Times to stop publishing, Attorney General John Mitchell and President Nixon obtained a federal court injunction that The New York Times cease publication of excerpts. District court judge refused, and the government appealed. While it was generally seen as a victory for those who claim the First Amendment enshrines an absolute right to free speech, many felt it a lukewarm victory, offering little protection for future publishers when claims of national security were at stake.

This was a jab at competing papers such as Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal which were now being known for a lurid, sensationalist and often inaccurate reporting of facts and opinions known by the end of the century as "yellow journalism".The newspaper's influence grew during 1870–1 when it published a series of exposés on William Magear ("Boss") Tweed, leader of the city's Democratic Party—popularly known as "Tammany Hall" (from its early 19th Century meeting headquarters)—that led to the end of the "Tweed Ring's" domination of New York's City Hall.While this move cost The New York Times a portion of its readership among its more progressive and Republican readers (the revenue went down from 8,000 to ,000 from 1883-4; however, some part of this was due to the price going down to two cents, in order to compete with the World and Sun), the paper eventually regained most of its lost ground within a few years.When The New York Times began publishing its series, President Richard Nixon became incensed. Supreme Court agreed to take both cases, merging them into New York Times Co. The justices wrote nine separate opinions, disagreeing on significant substantive issues.His words to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger included "People have gotta be put to the torch for this sort of thing..." and "Let's get the son-of-a-bitch in jail." After failing to get The New York Times to stop publishing, Attorney General John Mitchell and President Nixon obtained a federal court injunction that The New York Times cease publication of excerpts. District court judge refused, and the government appealed. While it was generally seen as a victory for those who claim the First Amendment enshrines an absolute right to free speech, many felt it a lukewarm victory, offering little protection for future publishers when claims of national security were at stake.At "Newspaper Row", across from City Hall, Henry Raymond, owner and editor of The New York Times, averted the rioters with "Gatling" (early machine, rapid-firing) guns, one of which he manned himself.