Sep 11 0 5 not updating clients

06-Oct-2019 12:41

As RSS was being embraced by web publishers who wanted their feeds to be used on My. Com and other early RSS portals, Netscape dropped RSS support from My. Com in April 2001 during new owner AOL's restructuring of the company, also removing documentation and tools that supported the format.Two parties emerged to fill the void, with neither Netscape's help nor approval: The RSS-DEV Working Group and Dave Winer, whose User Land Software had published some of the first publishing tools outside Netscape that could read and write RSS.In September 2002, Winer released a major new version of the format, RSS 2.0, that redubbed its initials Really Simple Syndication.RSS 2.0 removed the type attribute added in the RSS 0.94 draft and added support for namespaces.A standard XML file format ensures compatibility with many different machines/programs.RSS feeds also benefit users who want to receive timely updates from favourite websites or to aggregate data from many sites.

He also released drafts of RSS 0.93 and RSS 0.94 that were subsequently withdrawn.Guha and others in Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework.This would be Netscape's last participation in RSS development for eight years.To preserve backward compatibility with RSS 0.92, namespace support applies only to other content included within an RSS 2.0 feed, not the RSS 2.0 elements themselves.(Although other standards such as Atom attempt to correct this limitation, RSS feeds are not aggregated with other content often enough to shift the popularity from RSS to other formats having full namespace support.) Because neither Winer nor the RSS-DEV Working Group had Netscape's involvement, they could not make an official claim on the RSS name or format.

He also released drafts of RSS 0.93 and RSS 0.94 that were subsequently withdrawn.Guha and others in Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework.This would be Netscape's last participation in RSS development for eight years.To preserve backward compatibility with RSS 0.92, namespace support applies only to other content included within an RSS 2.0 feed, not the RSS 2.0 elements themselves.(Although other standards such as Atom attempt to correct this limitation, RSS feeds are not aggregated with other content often enough to shift the popularity from RSS to other formats having full namespace support.) Because neither Winer nor the RSS-DEV Working Group had Netscape's involvement, they could not make an official claim on the RSS name or format.For example, the RSS 2.* branch was the first to support enclosures, making it the current leading choice for podcasting, and as of 2005 is the format supported for that use by i Tunes and other podcasting software; however, an enclosure extension is now available for the RSS 1.* branch, mod_enclosure.