Sex conversations to read

19-Jun-2020 20:03

All my confidence is bestowed on him, all his confidence is devoted to me; we are precisely suited in character—perfect concord is the result.

This, one of the final passages of Jane Eyre, summarizes the novel’s “happy ending.” Its implications have generated much debate over the way Brontë chose to conclude her book.

Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth.

Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.

I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man. They have a worth—so I have always believed; and if I cannot believe it now, it is because I am insane—quite insane: with my veins running fire, and my heart beating faster than I can count its throbs.” In this quotation, near the end of Chapter 27, Jane asserts her strong sense of moral integrity over and against her intense immediate feelings.

soothe him; save him; love him; tell him you love him and will be his. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself.

” Still indomitable was the reply: “I care for myself.

The diction highlights Jane’s feelings of imprisonment (she paces the corridors like a creature caged), and her longings for freedom and equality.

Jane’s words are also relevant to Brontë’s own experience as a writer, and to the general condition of Victorian women.

I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man. They have a worth—so I have always believed; and if I cannot believe it now, it is because I am insane—quite insane: with my veins running fire, and my heart beating faster than I can count its throbs.” In this quotation, near the end of Chapter 27, Jane asserts her strong sense of moral integrity over and against her intense immediate feelings. soothe him; save him; love him; tell him you love him and will be his. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. ” Still indomitable was the reply: “I care for myself.The diction highlights Jane’s feelings of imprisonment (she paces the corridors like a creature caged), and her longings for freedom and equality.Jane’s words are also relevant to Brontë’s own experience as a writer, and to the general condition of Victorian women.Misguided religion threatens to oppress Jane throughout the book, and St. He also embodies masculine dominance, another force that threatens Jane like a “stringent yoke” over the course of the novel. John’s “warrior-march” and notes his assertion of his “masterhood.” Jane must escape such control in order to remain true to herself, for she realizes that her conventional manner of dealing with oppression—by retreating into herself, into the recesses of her imagination, into conversation with herself—cannot constitute a way of life.