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The Senate committee asked the GAO to review the U. During its review, Sandia determined that a significant overram of the powder bags into the gun had occurred as it was being loaded and that the overram could have caused the explosion. Navy expressed regret (but not an apology) to Hartwig's family and closed its investigation. To assist the GAO, Sandia National Laboratories provided a team of scientists to review the Navy's technical investigation.During the investigation, numerous leaks to the media, later attributed to U. Navy officers and investigators, implied that Hartwig and another sailor, Kendall Truitt, had engaged in a homosexual relationship and that Hartwig had caused the explosion after their relationship had soured. The victims' families, the media, and members of the U. Moosally was led to believe, falsely, that top officials from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) had authorized the experiments. Bulkeley personally recommended to the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Admiral James Watkins, and the Secretary of the Navy, John Lehman, that Iowa be taken out of service immediately.The spanning tray is then folded out of the way and the breech block is closed and locked.s new executive officer, Commander John Morse, directed a main battery drill, over the objections of his gun crews, in which Turrets One and Two fired while both were pointed 15° off the starboard side of the ship's bow.

House Armed Services Committees both held hearings to inquire into the Navy's investigation and later released reports disputing the U. A subsequent test by the Navy of the overram scenario confirmed that an overram could have caused an explosion in the gun breech. Navy, with Sandia's assistance, reopened the investigation. Navy, however, disagreed with Sandia's opinion and concluded that the cause of the explosion could not be determined. After serving in both World War II and the Korean War, Iowa was decommissioned on 24 February 1958 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. At this time, Iowa was moved to Avondale Shipyards near New Orleans, Louisiana, to undergo a modernization as part of President Ronald Reagan's "600-ship Navy" plan. Gneckow, she was recommissioned on 28 April 1984, one year ahead of schedule. Among many other deficiencies, the ship was unable to achieve her top speed of 33 knots (38 mph; 61 km/h) during a full-power engine run.

During the shoot, according to Turret Two's left gun captain, Jack Thompson, one of the powder bags in the left gun began to smolder before the breechlock was closed.

Thompson said that he was barely able to close and latch the breechlock before the gun discharged on its own.

Skelley claimed that one of the 16 inch shells traveled 23.4 nautical miles (40 km), setting a record for the longest conventional 16 inch (406.4mm) shell ever fired.

Although the shells had been fired without serious incident, Meyer and Petty Officer First Class Dale Eugene Mortensen, gun chief for Turret One, told Skelley that they would no longer participate in his experiments.

House Armed Services Committees both held hearings to inquire into the Navy's investigation and later released reports disputing the U. A subsequent test by the Navy of the overram scenario confirmed that an overram could have caused an explosion in the gun breech. Navy, with Sandia's assistance, reopened the investigation. Navy, however, disagreed with Sandia's opinion and concluded that the cause of the explosion could not be determined. After serving in both World War II and the Korean War, Iowa was decommissioned on 24 February 1958 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. At this time, Iowa was moved to Avondale Shipyards near New Orleans, Louisiana, to undergo a modernization as part of President Ronald Reagan's "600-ship Navy" plan. Gneckow, she was recommissioned on 28 April 1984, one year ahead of schedule. Among many other deficiencies, the ship was unable to achieve her top speed of 33 knots (38 mph; 61 km/h) during a full-power engine run.

During the shoot, according to Turret Two's left gun captain, Jack Thompson, one of the powder bags in the left gun began to smolder before the breechlock was closed.

Thompson said that he was barely able to close and latch the breechlock before the gun discharged on its own.

Skelley claimed that one of the 16 inch shells traveled 23.4 nautical miles (40 km), setting a record for the longest conventional 16 inch (406.4mm) shell ever fired.

Although the shells had been fired without serious incident, Meyer and Petty Officer First Class Dale Eugene Mortensen, gun chief for Turret One, told Skelley that they would no longer participate in his experiments.

In fact, John Mc Eachren, a mid-level bureaucrat with NAVSEA, had given the go-ahead to conduct the experiments even though he had no authority to do so.