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27-Dec-2019 16:40

Sroufe's (1983) conceptualization and application of attachment theory to early conduct problems was also instrumental, describing how avoidant working models are formed during infancy and demonstrating how they predisposed children to show later noncompliant and hostile acting out behavior (Erickson, Sroufe, & Egeland, 1985).

Greenberg's and Speltz' (1988) cognitive_affective model, also conceptualized from an attachment perspective, provided specific examples of how parent_child interchanges from ages 2 to 4 would lead to early disruptive behavior based on the dyad's inability to form a goal_corrected partnership.

As the child's aversive behaviors increase in intensity and frequency, the parent acquiesces, unwittingly reinforcing them.

These cycles eventually lead to the child's open defiance and behavior problems that in later development include being away from home excessively, lying, stealing, and more serious behaviors such as fire_setting.

Ethological/evolutionary theory placed still greater emphasis on the communicative function of emotions and social relationships, as well as on the adaptive value of the mother_infant relationship.

Attachment theory has also been used to provide a framework for understanding the origins of early conduct problems (see Greenberg, Speltz, & De Klyen, 1993).According to Patterson's early starter model, families provide direct training in antisocial behavior for young boys through their family management practices.While Patterson (1982) acknowledges that children contribute to parent's ineffective parenting, greater emphasis is placed on parent than child characteristics.In a coercive cycle, parent and child each behave in a way that is aversive to the other in order to control the other's behavior.As the child becomes increasingly irritating, the parent escalates power assertion techniques.

Attachment theory has also been used to provide a framework for understanding the origins of early conduct problems (see Greenberg, Speltz, & De Klyen, 1993).

According to Patterson's early starter model, families provide direct training in antisocial behavior for young boys through their family management practices.

While Patterson (1982) acknowledges that children contribute to parent's ineffective parenting, greater emphasis is placed on parent than child characteristics.

In a coercive cycle, parent and child each behave in a way that is aversive to the other in order to control the other's behavior.

As the child becomes increasingly irritating, the parent escalates power assertion techniques.

The goal of this paper is to revisit a developmental model of early conduct problems proposed earlier this decade (Shaw & Bell, 1993).