Validating a survey

11-Mar-2020 06:18

It is perhaps more important to ask questions that involve decision making criteria.Business research usually seeks to answer one or more testable research questions.There are basically two kinds of research questions: testable and non-testable.

As the process continues, the goals become more clearly defined and the research issues are narrowed.

For example, the site cannot determine your email name unless you choose to type it.

Allowing a website to create a cookie does not give that or any other site access to the rest of your computer, and only the site that created the cookie can read it.

The null hypothesis is created from the hypothesis by adding the words "no" or "not" to the statement.

For example, the null hypotheses for the two examples would be: There is no significant relationship between a customer's age and their level of satisfaction with the service.

As the process continues, the goals become more clearly defined and the research issues are narrowed.

For example, the site cannot determine your email name unless you choose to type it.

Allowing a website to create a cookie does not give that or any other site access to the rest of your computer, and only the site that created the cookie can read it.

The null hypothesis is created from the hypothesis by adding the words "no" or "not" to the statement.

For example, the null hypotheses for the two examples would be: There is no significant relationship between a customer's age and their level of satisfaction with the service.

For example, imagine that we've done our survey, and now we need to decide what constitutes satisfactory service? There is no exact cutoff point where we would say "yes" our customers are satisfied, or "no" they are not.