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The earliest of his extant writings is the Bellum Judaicarum (or Jewish War), which was apparently drafted initially in Aramaic and then translated into Greek 5 to 10 years after the 70 C. His last two works, probably published shortly before his death, include the Vita (or Life), an autobiography intended primarily to defend his conduct during the Jewish War 30 years earlier, and Contra Apionem (or Against Apion), an apologetic defense of Judaism against a wave of anti-Semitism emanating from Alexandria. His writings, while generally ignored by fellow Jews, were preserved by Christians not only because they chronicled generally and so well the "time between the testaments," but also because they contained specific references to John the Baptist, Jesus of Nazareth, and Jesus' brother James.On the much-disputed matter of whether Josephus mentioned Jesus, see my essay on the Testimonium Flavianum.Swiss naturalist Conrad Gesner used the words lituum alpinum for the first known detailed description of the alphorn in his De raris et admirandis herbis in 1555.The oldest known document using the German word Alphorn is a page from a 1527 account book from the former Cistercian abbey St.Whiston (early 18th cent) could only argue for authenticity by virtue of his premise that josephus was a Christian and became bishop of Jerusalem.That proposal has been thoroughly discredited; a fortiori....He is most widely known by the Roman name he then acquired, Flavius Josephus (or simply "Josephus").In Rome Josephus resided in an apartment within the emperor's house and devoted much of his time to writing.

and was given the Hebrew name Joseph ben Mattathias.

I am informed of the following by Stephen Carlson: Subject: Re: IOU: "Josephus's" Discourse to the Greeks on Hades In fact the passage belongs to a work by Hippolytus of Rome entitled Against the Greeks and Plato on the Universe.

The work is lost except for a rather lengthy fragment preserved in John of Damscus' Sacra Parallela which includes the excerpt on Hades and the comparison between Minos, Rhadamanthos, and Christ.

Although a "Discourse to the Greeks on Hades" is present in Whiston's translation, few if any scholars today believe that Josephus wrote this work.

This is why parallels with NT phrases have been italicized at Wheaton's on-line library (above).

and was given the Hebrew name Joseph ben Mattathias.I am informed of the following by Stephen Carlson: Subject: Re: IOU: "Josephus's" Discourse to the Greeks on Hades In fact the passage belongs to a work by Hippolytus of Rome entitled Against the Greeks and Plato on the Universe.The work is lost except for a rather lengthy fragment preserved in John of Damscus' Sacra Parallela which includes the excerpt on Hades and the comparison between Minos, Rhadamanthos, and Christ.Although a "Discourse to the Greeks on Hades" is present in Whiston's translation, few if any scholars today believe that Josephus wrote this work.This is why parallels with NT phrases have been italicized at Wheaton's on-line library (above).Two years later he was pressed to serve as the general of the Jewish forces in Galilee in the revolt against Rome.